Aktualności ze świata miłośników twórczości Tolkiena

G-i-P Report: Khuzdûl in the Hobbit movie

G-i-P stands for Gwaith-i-Phethdain, ‚The Fellowship of the Word-smiths’ or the linguistic website devoted to post-Tolkienian constructions in the „reconstructed” languages of Middle-earth [link]. Now Elendilion will continue the G-i-P‚s tradition of the linguistic reports concerning Peter Jackson’s movies, especially The Hobbit film.

Somebody may wonder if the upcoming The Hobbit movie will contain as rich linguistic material as the three parts of Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings. Will the actors speak languages of Middle-earth? Which languages? Will we see new beautiful artifacts with runes or Fëanorian letters like swords or the artwork? Will they sing in Elvish or Dwarvish in The Hobbit soundtrack? We can say „Yes, they will”. We can say also that it is very possible all the linguistic material is already translated by a Tolkienian linguist (David Salo?) or by a group of the linguistis.

Probably the first sentences in the languages of Middle-earth which were already revealed are two Khuzdûl phrases which can be found on P. Jackson’s vlog’s entry [see here]. So Khuzdûl will be featured for sure!  These phrases are:

[Adam Brown, „Ori”:]
Gelek d’ash undbar [or Gelek dashund bar]

‚?’ [my transcription can be erroneous]

[Marc Zender comments:
First, I think Adam Brown (Ori) actually says Gelekh dash undbar, with aspirated -kh at the end of the first word. Listen carefully to Roisín Carty (the dialog coach) and then to Brown. But notice also (at 05:41 in the video) that behind Roisín, on the white board, is written R, TH, KH, strongly suggesting that they were working on the special sounds of Khuzdul: uvular R and aspirated TH and KH. (There is also written “axe = b…” and “axes = b…”, where the hidden elements must have given singular bark and plural baruk, to illustrate Khuzdul plural formation.) But much of Adam’s sentence is newly invented vocabulary, and I’m afraid I can’t make it out with any certainty.]

and

[William Kircher, „Bifur”:]
Khuzd belkur!
‚Mighty Dwarf’ [khuzd ‚Dwarf’, *belkur ‚mighty’]

[Marc Zender comments:
I think he actually says Khuzd belkul!, with a final -l, and naturally he provides his own translation: “mighty dwarf”. Now, khuzd is of course well known as the singular for “dwarf”. As for the unattested belkul, this may contain the -ul adjectival suffix seen in Khuzdul ‘Dwarvish’. Its radicals would then seem to be B-L-K “mighty,” and I suppose that it is imagined by David Salo as having been a borrowing from Elvish. Compare Noldorin beleg “great, mighty” (< BÉL-EK, Etym.), Quenya melehta “mighty” (PE17:115) and, of course, Melkor “He that arises in might”. Note also the noun + adjective order of “dwarf mighty” for “mighty dwarf”. This is a typical feature of Semitic syntax, from which Salo would seem to have drawn some inspiration. Yet the pattern in Khuzdul noun compounds is generally, though admittedly not always, the reverse — e.g., Sigin-tarâg, long + beards, for “Long beards” (PM:321). So this syntactical construction is one I’m still a bit uncertain of.]

Richard Armitage („Thorin”) said in the interview on Jackson’s videoblog:

We’ve all learnt a bit of the Dwarf language, Khuzdûl, so we all have a kind of selection of words to fall back on, and curses and battle-cries

We trust the latter means that we may, at long last, hear the famous words Baruk Khazâd! Khazâd ai-mênu! uttered on a field of battle.

We’re waiting for new information about the languages of Tolkien in Jackson’s movies. Feel free to send the reports to elendilion@elendilion.pl We’re looking forward to your comments too.

Kategorie wpisu: G-i-P Report, In Westron (English), Lingwistyka

10 Komentarzy do wpisu "G-i-P Report: Khuzdûl in the Hobbit movie"

Galadhorn, dnia 23.08.2011 o godzinie 8:36

On TOR.net Facebook they wrote: „FWIW, David Salo doesn’t seem to be involved as a linguistics advisor this time round.”

If not Salo then who is such a talented Tolkienian linguist that was able to prepare such Neo-Dwarvish dialogs?

Elendilion – Tolkienowski Serwis Informacyjny » Blog Archive » G-i-P Report: David Salo consults The Hobbit movie!, dnia 06.10.2011 o godzinie 10:50

[…] About the Khuzdul sentences from The Hobbit you can already read here. […]

Galadhorn, dnia 06.10.2011 o godzinie 10:57

Now we already know that it is David who consults the movie.

Marc Zender, dnia 01.01.2012 o godzinie 5:29

This is just a test to see if the comments allow html tags:

khuzd
khuzd
khuzd

(You can delete as you like.)

Marc Zender, dnia 01.01.2012 o godzinie 5:54

A very interesting post, Ryszard! How nice to have a peek at the language coaching for The Hobbit. I just have a few additional comments regarding the Neo-Khuzdul in the third production video, which I’ll divide into three posts.

First, I think Adam Brown (Ori) actually says Gelekh dash undbar, with aspirated -kh at the end of the first word. Listen carefully to Roisín Carty (the dialog coach) and then to Brown. But notice also (at 05:41 in the video) that behind Roisín, on the white board, is written R, TH, KH, strongly suggesting that they were working on the special sounds of Khuzdul: uvular R and aspirated TH and KH. (There is also written „axe = b…” and „axes = b…”, where the hidden elements must have given singular bark and plural baruk, to illustrate Khuzdul plural formation.) But much of Adam’s sentence is newly invented vocabulary, and I’m afraid I can’t make it out with any certainty.

Marc Zender, dnia 01.01.2012 o godzinie 5:56

Second, and thankfully much clearer, is the short sentence by William Kircher (Bifur). I think he actually says khuzd belkul, with a final -l, and naturally he provides his own translation: „mighty dwarf”. Now, khuzd is of course well known as the singular for „dwarf”. As for the unattested belkul, this may contain the -ul adjectival suffix seen in Khuzdul ‘Dwarvish’. Its radicals would then seem to be B-L-K „mighty,” and I suppose that it is imagined by David Salo as having been a borrowing from Elvish. Compare Noldorin beleg „great, mighty” (< BÉL-EK, Etym.), Quenya melehta „mighty” (PE17:115) and, of course, Melkor „He that arises in might”. Note also the noun + adjective order of „dwarf mighty” for „mighty dwarf”. This is a typical feature of Semitic syntax, from which Salo would seem to have drawn some inspiration. Yet the pattern in Khuzdul noun compounds is generally, though admittedly not always, the reverse — e.g., Sigin-tarâg, long + beards, for „Long beards” (PM:321). So this syntactical construction is one I’m still a bit uncertain of.

Marc Zender, dnia 01.01.2012 o godzinie 5:57

Third, listening carefully to William Armitage (Thorin) at 05:47, I think he says that „we’ve all learnt a bit of the Dwarf language, Khuzdul, so we all have a kind of selection of words to fall back on, and curses and battle-cries”.

I trust the latter means that we may, at long last, hear the famous words Baruk Khazâd! Khazâd ai-mênu! uttered on a field of battle. I doubt I was the only one who missed them at Helm’s Deep in The Two Towers.

Galadhorn, dnia 01.01.2012 o godzinie 10:51

Marc, thank you for your detailed analysis. It’s great we can find out so much new information in this short film material. Thanks for your corrections! I agree with you, and I will add your analysis to my text, ok?

Happy New Year!

Marc Zender, dnia 02.01.2012 o godzinie 7:15

Hi Ryszard! I agree — it was thoughtful of Jackson to include some tidbits about the language material in the production videos. And sure, please feel free to incorporate my ideas into the main article.

Happy New Year to you too!

Elendilion – Tolkienowski Serwis Informacyjny » Blog Archive » G-i-P Report: The Hobbit linguistic summary (to be continued), dnia 04.09.2012 o godzinie 12:35

[…] 1. [Ori:] Gelekh dash undbar ‘?’ [analysis] […]

Zostaw komentarz